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Menai Bridge Slipway

The Menai Bridge slipway is definitely one of the best in North Wales, though there are pros and cons. The official Welsh name for the area is Porth Y Wrach.

Menai Bridge town sits in the shadow of the historic Menai Bridge. Junction 9 of the A55 is literally only a 6 minute drive away, Junction 8a is 5 minutes from the slipway. 9a will take you over the Menai Bridge and 8a will take you across the Britannia Bridge.

On arrival you will notice there is limited parking especially if there are a few trailers. Its always best to get here early and make sure you get a spot, or you will have to park elsewhere. You can park around 7-10 cars depending on trailers, failing that there is pay and display close by. During the summer months it can get busy.

Menai Bridge Slipway is used by all manner of watercraft, PWC, Boats, Canoes, Kayaks and is also used to launch the local fast Rib rides. Depending on what you are launching the slipway gives you access to eastern Anglesey via the Menai Strait.

A few of the popular places to visit reasonably close by are Puffin Island and Llanddwyn Island. The straits also give good sea fishing at various points, the South end of the Menai is know for its Bass and Tope. The area to the North around Puffin Island is well known for its Mackerel Shoals during summer.

Launching from Menai Bridge Slipway can be done at all states of the tide via the concrete ramp. The slipway is grippy enough for most vehicles and not too severe a gradient. One thing to be aware of is that the main parking area can and will flood on big spring tides but is otherwise fine. With the exceptions of slack water you will be launching into tidal water. However the sides do offer protection from this apart from at the lower end of the tide but its easily manageable.

Safety first, the Menai Strait can be dangerous between the two bridges. The area is known as the swellies and contains strong currents and submerged obstacles. Navigation also changes in terms of the green and red buoys as they switch sides. At high tide it is easy to safely navigate but low water presents the under water dangers. Please consult charts if moving between the bridges at low water.

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